ANTHONY WILLIAMS TIPS FOR TYPE 2 DIABETES AND HYPOGLYCAEMIA (PART 1)

ANTHONY WILLIAMS TIPS FOR TYPE 2 DIABETES AND HYPOGLYCAEMIA (PART 1)

Our body's primary fuel is glucose, a sugar that provides all cells with the energy they need to function, heal, grow and thrive. Glucose keeps us moving and keeps us alive. The central nervous system, as well as every organ in the body, including the heart, work with it. Glucose is what we use to build and maintain muscles and perform vital functions such as repairing damaged tissues and cells.

When you eat food, your body breaks down the sugars in it into glucose and puts it into your bloodstream so it can reach all your cells. However, your cells do not have direct access to all the glucose. They need help from the pancreas, which is a large endocrine gland located behind the stomach. How much help your cells need depends on the combinations of foods you eat.

Your pancreas constantly monitors blood flow. When it detects a rise in glucose levels, it responds by producing a hormone called insulin. Insulin binds to your cells and signals them to open up and absorb glucose from the blood. In this way, insulin allows the cells to get the energy they need and ensures stable blood glucose levels.

If there's more glucose in your blood than your cells can use—for example, if you've eaten a particularly heavy meal (like pork ribs slathered in syrupy barbecue sauce; in other words, lots of fat combined with sugar)—insulin directs the extra glucose to be stored in the liver. Later, when glucose levels drop—for example, between meals or during intense physical activity—the liver will release the stored glucose to be used by your cells. This happens if the liver is strong and functioning normally.

This is usually the efficient system for optimal glucose utilization. However, it starts to go haywire if the pancreas can't produce enough insulin when it's needed. It gets confused and if some of your cells refuse to allow insulin to attach and open the cells to accept glucose because there is too much fat in the bloodstream that interferes with that process - that is the real cause of insulin resistance . Another element that can go wrong is if the liver becomes stagnant, sluggish and dysfunctional, meaning it can no longer store glucose or release it properly.

When any or all of these problems occur, the cells do not remove enough glucose from the blood. The body will get rid of some of the excess glucose in the urine, which can make you urinate more often and also make you dehydrated and thirsty. It's not the sugar's (your glucose) fault. This is a result of how much fat is in your bloodstream. Although the sugar is excreted and expelled through the urine, technically the thirst is due to the fats in the blood causing dehydration. Also, in most cases when fat is eaten with sugars, it is accompanied by excess salt, and salt also plays a role in the dehydration process.

If your pancreas does not make enough insulin when your body needs it, and/or if you experience insulin resistance and if these problems lead to extremely high blood glucose levels, you are at risk for type 2 diabetes. Although medical research and science are aware of pre-diabetes, which precedes type 2 diabetes, they don't know that there are even earlier stages: pre-diabetes, pre-pre-diabetes and even pre-pre-pre-diabetes. These earlier versions of prediabetes occur because the liver begins to stagnate and slow down from a high-fat diet and is unable to store glucose as it should. At the same time, the appearance of a pre-diabetic state of the liver can also be observed. The earlier stages of both diabetes and fatty liver may go unnoticed.

Medical professionals do not know why type 2 diabetes occurs. This is evident from the diets that doctors and nutritionists recommend for diabetics. If they knew what was really going on in the bodies of these patients, they would offer completely different nutritional advice. While doctors correctly understand some elements of treatment, they are unable to offer an understanding of how or why this disease begins.

In the two parts of this article, you will learn what exactly causes type 2 diabetes. It will also explain how insulin resistance occurs, as well as what hypoglycemia is and how to rebalance your system so that your body has the opportunity to heal.

Symptoms of type 2 diabetes

If you have type 2 diabetes, you may experience one or more of the following symptoms. (Keep in mind that it's possible to be in the early stages of diabetes and not experience any symptoms.)

  • Unusual thirst, dry mouth, frequent urination: this is due to the body being overloaded with fat. Too much free-floating fat is retained in the liver, lymphatic system, and circulation from a prolonged high-fat diet. Fat in the bloodstream prevents water from being easily absorbed into it and becoming useful. Another reason is that due to insulin resistance, which prevents sugar from entering the cells, your body uses up water to expel excess glucose through urine. These effects of a high-fat diet can cause thirst, dry mouth, and frequent urination. (Excessive salt consumption usually accompanies high-fat consumption, although these symptoms can occur without salt.)
  • Blurred vision: the central nervous system needs glucose to function optimally. If insulin resistance persists due to a high-fat diet, blurred vision may occur intermittently or permanently. It doesn't help that with dehydration, water can pull away from the lenses of the eyes to help flush out excess glucose.
  • Unusual hunger: This is because your cells aren't getting all the glucose they need to feed themselves, because fat prevents glucose from getting into the cells.
  • Fatigue and irritability: This is because you're not getting the energy you normally get when your cells are fully loaded with glucose. Be aware that there may be another condition, such as a low-grade viral infection, causing fatigue in addition to insulin resistance, prediabetes, or type 2 diabetes.
  • Digestive problems: the pancreas not only produces insulin, but also enzymes that help the body break down food. If your pancreas is not working well enough, it leads not only to a lack of insulin, but also of enzymes, which makes digestion difficult. Usually, enzyme deficiency is not the worst thing. It is more difficult when the liver is weak, congested or sluggish and does not produce enough bile to break down fat. This stresses the stomach glands, prompting them to overproduce hydrochloric acid, which can weaken the glands. When the liver is stronger and healthier, it puts less strain on the pancreas.
  • Hypoglycemia: These energy dips—drops in blood sugar that occur as often as every two hours—result from a weak liver and underactive adrenal glands. When the liver is stagnant and sluggish, it can reach a point where it can no longer store glucose, meaning it can't release glucose into the bloodstream when your blood sugar drops. Instead, the adrenal glands must overcompensate for the blood sugar drop – when blood sugar drops, adrenaline increases to replace it as fuel, which over time causes the adrenal glands to weaken. People who intermittently fast incorrectly end up destroying and weakening their adrenal glands because they are running on adrenaline instead of glucose. (Read more about intermittent fasting in Cleanse for Health )

See the continuation of the article in "Anthony William's Tips for Type 2 Diabetes and Hypoglycaemia (Part 2)" .

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